How Do I File A Claim For Pothole Damage??

Fortunately many—but not all—cities let you file a pothole claim if your car sustains substantial damage from a pothole on a state or city roadway.

  • Keep a detailed record.
  • Take a photo of the pothole.
  • Get the contact information of any witnesses.
  • File a police report.
  • Get two or three repair estimates.

How do I file a claim for pothole damage in Los Angeles?

Request pothole repairs

  1. Online. In the city of Los Angeles, use the MyLA311 app’s “submit service request” feature.
  2. By phone. Diall 311 or, if you’re outside the area: 213-473-3231.
  3. Vehicle damage claims. Drivers seeking compensation for vehicle damage due to potholes can file a claim with the city online.

Can I sue for pothole damage?

Your City Could Pay for Car Damage Caused by Potholes. It’s common to hear that if your car is damaged due to a pothole, you should file a claim to get the locality responsible for the road to cover the expenses.

How do I file a claim with the state of California?

A personal injury attorney can advise you about the next steps to take after you file a tort claim. For legal assistance call 800-776-5746 or complete a request for assistance form. For all other purposes call 916-504-5800 (Northern CA); 213-213-8000 (Southern CA).

Can I make the city pay for pothole damage?

Cities That Pay Pothole Claims. For some lucky citizens, their city or state government might actually cover damage from potholes. The payments from the city can take up to six months to process and are not always for the full amount. The city thinks that they are not 100% responsible for the damage.

Can I claim for pothole damage on my car insurance?

All other roads. Any damage that a pothole causes to your car could be their responsibility, and so you may be entitled to compensation. If, however, your car is damaged due to other debris on the road, you aren’t entitled to compensation. For this, you’d need to make a claim on your car insurance policy.

Photo in the article by “US Fish and Wildlife Service” https://www.fws.gov/mountain-prairie/contaminants/index.php