Question: How Does The Pacific Ocean Affect California Weather??

Ocean currents act much like a conveyer belt, transporting warm water and precipitation from the equator toward the poles and cold water from the poles back to the tropics.

Thus, currents regulate global climate, helping to counteract the uneven distribution of solar radiation reaching Earth’s surface.

Why is the Pacific Ocean important?

Economic Importance of the Pacific Ocean. The Pacific contains significant deposits of oil and gas, and its waters are home to thousands of important edible species in the fishing industry. The Pacific Ocean is shrinking by one centimeter per year as a result of the movement of tectonic plates.

How does the California Current affect weather?

The California Current moves less water than the Gulf Stream does. But the California Current has a big effect on the climate of the West Coast of the United States. Usually, the climate along the West Coast is cooler than the climate of inland areas at the same latitude and elevation.

How much higher is the Pacific than the Atlantic?

The surface of the Pacific Ocean stands about 40 cm higher than the Atlantic Ocean with respect to the 1000-decibar surface, and the North Atlantic and North Pacific stand respectively about 14 and 17 cm higher than the South Atlantic and Pacific.

How do ocean currents affect California?

Warm ocean currents heat the air above the water and carry the warm air to the land, increasing the temperature of the coastal region. For example, cities along the west coast of the United States are affected by a cool ocean current that carries cool air toward the California coast.

How does the ocean affect us?

It provides over 70 percent of the oxygen we breathe and over 97 percent of the world’s water supply. Everyday, the ocean is under attack from natural sources and manmade pollution. Pollution does not only affect marine life and their environment, it also affects mankind.

Photo in the article by “NASA Earth Observatory” https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/blogs/earthmatters/page/10/?iframe=true&width=100%25&height=100%25